Monday, December 2, 2019

How To Minimize Weight Gain Over The Holidays

by Dr. Ann-Marie Regina, ND 

The holidays are a time when indulgence is typical. It's hard to say no when there is a great host of food and desserts.  But how do you feel when the holidays are over? Do you feel guilty? Have you gained a couple pounds? Being strategic about what you eat can still satisfy your indulgences so you can enjoy yourself and keep you on track.

The Basics On How To Minimize Weight Gain



The holidays should be an enjoyable time with your family and friends, and food is what usually brings it all together. The idea is not to be overly restrictive with your foods, while also making sure you don't over do it. Here are some of the basic ways to modify your habits over the holidays that will help you to keep the weight off.

1. Eat Your Protein & Fats! Protein and fat are more satiating, meaning that you will feel more full for longer compared to a meal that is heavy in carbohydrates. Protein and fat also slow down the release of sugar into your blood stream, keeping your blood sugar balanced. So if you have the option of a turkey leg or a plate of pasta, choose the turkey!

2. Eat your vegetables! Vegetables are high in fibre and will also keep you full and regulate your blood sugar. Baking some mixed veggies, such as sweet potato, parsnips, squash, pumpkin and brussel sprouts is an easy and delicious way to get in your veggies and help you feel good. Root vegetables are ideal for this time of year as they are easy to digest and will nourish your body.

3. Chew your food! Chewing your food adequately prevents you from overeating. It takes 20 minutes for your stomach to signal your brain that you are full. If you eat your food too quickly, you don't give your stomach enough time to send that message, resulting in the misguided sensation that you are still hungry. It is also important to remember that digestion begins in the mouth. The mouth has different enzymes that help to break down carbohydrates and protein. Chewing your food gives those enzymes time to take effect and mechanically will assist in the digesting process. Taking your time with your food will allow you to enjoy it and make you feel more satisfied so that you are less likely to add more to your plate.

4. Moderation & Balance! Of course you will be tempted by lavish desserts and 3 cheese lasagnas. It is okay to enjoy your food, but just remember your limits. If you already suffer from digestive issues or conditions that are aggravated by certain foods, be mindful of how much you are eating. If know that you will be having a large meal, the next day you can reduce your caloric intake to maintain that balance.

5. Movement! Try to incorporate exercise into your busy schedule over the holidays. That could mean stretching before bed or when you wake up in the morning. Exercise will help burn those extra calories, improve your digestion and give you more energy. 

6. Reduce your Snacking! Snacking can burden the digestive tract as it is not being given a break. There is a system called the migrating motor complex within your digestive tract that will cause your intestines to keep things moving. However, this function can only work while you are fasting. Making sure you leave 4-5 hours between meals to allow your digestive system to be swept clean by the migrating motor complex. If you tend to snack often, that may be a sign that your blood sugar has difficulty regulating itself. To investigate that symptom, see your naturopathic doctor to perform the necessary tests.  

Why Consider Nutritional Counselling?


If you already struggle with making healthy decisions when it comes to food, most likely the holidays are a challenging time for you. Nutritional counselling can help teach you which foods are right for your body and how you can sustainably make changes at your own pace. Most people have the perception that they can just start fresh in January, but research shows that the weight gained over the holidays is much harder to lose than weight gained at any other point in the year. Further, the habits formed over the holidays can sometimes be harder to kick. Before the holidays, learning your individual nutritional needs based on your food sensitivities, your health conditions, age, sex, activity level and hormones, will more likely keep you on the right path.

Dr. Ann-Marie Regina, ND, focuses on individualized nutritional counselling and helping patients make healthy lifestyle choices that are specific to them. Dr. Ann-Marie is now offering 30 minute nutritional consults focused solely on creating sustainable and effective dietary adjustments that will address your concerns. During a nutritional counselling visit, your nutrition and typical diet will be assessed and modified based on your needs. Dr. Ann-Marie will assess your nutrition with an assessment tool which investigates your water, protein, fat, vegetable, fruit and fibre intake and take special considerations such as individual health concerns into account.

To learn more about what foods work best with your body and nutritional counselling, please call the clinic at 905-940-2727 to book an appointment with Dr. Ann-Marie Regina or to schedule a complimentary 15 minute "meet and greet."


Sunday, December 1, 2019

Self Care...Beyond Bubble Baths

By: Dr. Jessica Nesbitt ND, CFMP

If I were to ask you the question;

"What do you do for self care"?

Would you be able to list one thing that you try to do on a daily basis in order to improve your health?

When I meet a new patient for their initial appointment I spend a lot of time getting to know their story, their medical history and current health concerns. I also make a point of asking if they know how stress effects their body and what they do for self care on a daily basis?

I have found that many people are not aware of the effects that stress has on their body and that often times a self care routine is non existent. When self care is mentioned, it usually involves activities like a massage, manicure, wine or a bubble bath. These activities are all enjoyable and can be forms of self care, but sometimes we need to go beyond the bubble baths!!

The Importance of Self Care

Self care can be defined as taking an active role to improve one's health.  We all know physical health is important for us. However, did you know much of our physical health is affected by our mental and emotional health?  Stress alone can have detrimental effects on physical health including fatigue, lowered immune system functioning and high blood pressure.  If we don’t slow down and take care of ourselves – physically, mentally and emotionally – we run the risk of deteriorating our overall wellness. Committing to a self-care routine can improve your health, self-esteem, compassion and empathy towards others. Self-care is saying to yourself, “I deserve to be healthy and feel my best”.  Contrary to popular belief, self care does not make you selfish.  It can be an ongoing challenge to make time for self care. There is often not enough hours in the day to accomplish everything we need to do. When you discover that you're neglecting a certain aspect of your life, create a plan for change.  You don't have to tackle everything all at once. Identify one small step you can take to begin caring for yourself better.  Then, schedule time to focus on your needs.  Even when you feel like you don't have time to squeeze in one more thing, make self care a priority.

Types of Self Care

I have broken down self care into three different categories and listed a few different ways to practise self care.

1. Physical Self Care: getting adequate sleep, individualized nutrition, movement/exercise, rest and annual physical exams with your naturopathic doctor.

2. Mental Self Care: trying to have a daily practice of gratitude, setting short term and long term goals, meditation, changing negative self talk.

3. Emotional Self Care: expressing emotions through talking, journalling, artwork or dance.  Practising forgiveness of yourself and others.  Practising self love which means that you unconditionally accept yourself. 


 Other Ways to Introduce Self Care into Your Life 


→ making difficult decisions that could improve the quality of your life 
→ setting boundaries with loved ones
→ cancelling exciting plans in order to rest when sick
→ down-sizing in order to be able to better afford life's necessities 
One of my goals as a naturopathic doctor is to educate and empower my patients. I encourage all of my patients to try and commit to a ritual of self care on a daily basis. All too often I see people who are constantly rushing through their days only to find that weeks or months have gone by and they are feeling run down or burned out.

If you find that lately you have been feeling run down, tired in the morning when you wake even though you have had a good night sleep or find that you are getting sick often I invite you to reach out and request a complimentary 15 minute "meet and greet" to find out how I can support you.  If you have any questions,  I can be reached at jnesbitt@naturopathicfoundations.ca





Are You Physically Ready for Winter?

By: Darryl Gomes  R. Kin., CAT(C), D.O.M.P., D.Sc.O.

During the past couple of weeks, winter appeared earlier than we expected. The temperatures dropped below zero into the double digits, and we experienced a couple of significant
snowfalls. Outside of getting the snow tires on the car, how ready are you for winter and how are you preparing for it? Here are some things to keep in mind to ensure you get through winter safely.

Dress Appropriately
  • Check the temperature before you head out. Don't just assume blue skies and sunshine mean it will be warm outside. Make sure to read the wind chill temperature as well, as that will give you a better sense of the ambient temperature. 
  • You should dress in layers depending on how long you will be out in the cold and the type of activities you will be doing. Whether you are snowboarding or shovelling the driveway, it is important to dress warmly. 
  • Make sure you have boots and gloves that will keep your extremities warm. For those that experience circulatory issues (such as Raynaud's Syndrome), you need to be extra careful and ensure your fingers and toes stay warm. If necessary, you may need to use chemical heat packs to keep them warm.
  • You may need to apply sunblock or lip balm to protect your skin and lips depending on how long you will be outside. Sunglasses may be required if you are going to be out in direct sun in order to avoid snow blindness.

Recognize the Signs of Frostbite and Hypothermia

  • Frostbite occurs when skin has been exposed to the cold for too long. You may experience a burning, numbness or stinging sensation in the affected areas, and prolonged exposure may lead to skin damage. Body parts such as your ears, nose and cheeks are most susceptible to frostbite. 
  • If you suspect you have frostbite, get out of the cold as soon as possible. 
  • Allow the tissue to warm up gradually. Don't put direct heat on it and don't rub the skin. The tissue can be fragile, and you may end up damaging it. 
  • If the burning, stinging or numbness sensations don't go away despite making these changes, you may need to seek emergency care.

Shovelling is Exercise

  • Depending on the amount of snow that needs to be cleared, shovelling can be a gruelling workout. Your muscles need to work hard in order to push and toss snow around. Therefore, you need to treat shovelling like you would any other exercise.
  • You may need to take a few minutes inside the house to do some squats, lunges and torso twists in order to get your body ready for shovelling.
  • Bend your legs when you pick up and throw snow. Do not bend over or throw snow with your back. 
  • Especially if there has been a heavy snowfall, you should section your driveway/sidewalk into small areas and deal with them one at a time, rather than trying to push the snow all the way from the top to the bottom of the driveway.
  • Take breaks, especially if the snow is wet and heavy. Even if you don't have any type of cardiovascular issues, taking a few minutes to catch your breath is always a good idea. 
  • Know your limitations and don't overdo it. You may need to rely on family members, neighbours or hired help to clear your driveway. Don't be afraid to ask for help if you need it, especially if you suffer from cardiovascular problems.

Dealing with Falls/Injuries

  • Whether you slip on a patch of ice walking to work or fall from catching an edge on the ice while skating, falls during winter are a common occurrence. Knowing how to take care of your injuries is important.
  • You will need to ice down any bumps or bruises you get. Make sure you have skin sensation (you can feel the difference between warm and cold along with the sensation of pressure) before you start icing the area down. Keep a cool damp towel between the skin and the ice pack to prevent frostbite. Keep the ice on for about 20 minutes or until the area feels numb. Do not re-apply cold until you can feel sensation in the area again.
  • Fractures are a common injury with slips and falls. If the pain you are experiencing is not resolving or gets worse after you ice and rest the area, you may need to seek medical help.
  • It is not uncommon to hurt your back or experience other types of pains from shovelling or other winter activities. Whether you have existing chronic injuries that are exacerbated by exercise, or receiving acute injuries, it is important to make sure you get them treated. 

So Where Does Osteopathy Fit in?

Be proactive and get treated now! If you suffer from poor balance, why wait for the snow and ice to arrive and increase your chances of falling/injury during winter? Take the time to treat your musculoskeletal issues, in addition to improving your balance with proprioceptive specific exercises. 

Osteopathic treatment can help to remove a lot of the existing problems that you currently have or may discover over the course of the winter.
  • Spinal misalignment can not only create musculoskeletal problems, but can lead to visceral problems. As signals from the spine to the different organs get impinged, the function of the organs can be affected. This is why someone who has back problems can develop such things as acid reflux or elimination problems. The corollary exists, where visceral problems can create spinal problems which may be the cause of back problems. 
  • Falls can create direct problems (such as falling on your pelvis) that can create imbalances in your body. If they are not treated, they can create compensations in the body that can lead to long term problems such as spinal misalignments. Bone bruises can affect the function of the bone and do need to be treated.
  • Pre-existing injuries can be compounded by new injuries. This is why activities such as shovelling can make you feel worse, even if you didn't think you overexerted yourself.
  • Colds and flus are synonymous with winter. Your body is constantly working hard to fight off infections. Ensuring you are eating properly and staying hydrated is important for providing your body with necessary nutrients. Osteopathic treatment can help to keep the body working efficiently, just like a winter tune up would for your car. 
If you have any questions about how osteopathy can help you, call the clinic at 905-940-2727 to book a free 15 minute consultation or email me at:

darryl@naturopathicfoundations.ca

Stay active!







Friday, November 22, 2019

What Is The Right Nutrition For Your Body?

By Dr. Ann-Marie Regina, ND


Eating can be complex. Getting the right nutrition for your body can be challenging, especially with overwhelming and conflicting resources that are being marketed to you. What works for one person, may not necessarily work for you. And what worked for you at one point in your life, may not work for you anymore. There is a lot of information out there regarding nutrition, but it is important to work with your naturopathic doctor to find out what is best for you, your lifestyle and your health condition(s).


The Basics For Building A Positive Relationship With Your Food


When a food disagrees with the body, some of common symptoms experienced include, but are not limited to: gas, bloating, diarrhea, constipation, joint pain and flare ups of preexisting skin conditions.   Here are some of the basics when building a healthy relationship with your food that will help alleviate the above symptoms to some degree. 

1. Eat Mindfully! It is important to listen to your body's cues while you eat in order to identify when you feel adequately full, or if certain foods are aggravating. Eating in front of the television or computer distracts you from connecting with your body's signals. You will be more likely to overeat and begin to associate technology with meal time. If you are going to reach for that bag of chips, really make sure that you are tasting each chip. The more time you spend really tasting and chewing, the less likely you will overeat and the more satisfied you will feel.  

2. Chew your food! Do you tend to inhale your food? Chewing your food adequately prevents you from overeating. It takes 20 minutes for your stomach to signal your brain that you are full. If you eat your food too quickly you don't give your stomach enough time to send that message, resulting in the misguided sensation that you are still hungry. Also, it is important to remember that digestion begins in the mouth. The mouth has different enzymes that help to break down carbohydrates and protein. Chewing your food gives those enzymes time to take effect and mechanically will assist in the digesting process.  

3. Ask yourself why? Do you tend to snack, not because you are hungry but just because you feel you "need" to have something? Try to explore the emotions behind why you reach for food. Overeating can be rooted in anxiety, stress or depression. Food can be used as a reward for many people and the brain really does see it that way. The more you feed those emotions, the more the brain associates that emotion with "needing" food to soothe. 

4. Enjoy your food! Do you like the foods that you are eating? Do you eat certain foods only because you think they are "good" for you? Developing a healthy relationship with your food also means that you enjoy what you are eating. This doesn't mean that you can eat whatever your heart desires. Remember moderation is key. But finding recipes that you like can make healthy food easier to eat and enjoy. If you live a busy lifestyle, focusing on making better food choices at restaurants can be another option.

5. Be sustainable! Creating strict do's and don'ts when it comes to food can be taxing emotionally. Learning what your body is able to tolerate is more useful and sustainable than completely cutting out a certain food for the rest of your life. Unless you have a specific illness that precludes you from consuming a food (for example, celiac disease and gluten), there is no reason that you should feel like you are "not allowed" to eat that food. In saying that, this is where dose comes into play. Make sure that if you do decide to eat a food that may not always agree with your system, the food is of good quality, you have only the amount that your body can handle and you enjoy it!

6. Moderation! There will be times when the food choices you have are not ideal, but are out of your control. For example at a birthday party or a wedding. Unless you are going to weddings every week, it is completely fine to have a slice of cake! Again, try to stay within your body's limits and enjoy what you are eating! Enjoying your food, no matter what it is, helps to nourish healthy emotions associated with foods.

Why Is It Beneficial To Get Personal Advice?


Have you seen advertisements categorizing certain foods as "bad" or "good"? The kind of language used when talking about food, creates an emotional connection with those foods. When food is labeled as "bad," there is a preconception that it should be avoided and, if consumed, there is an associated feeling of guilt. Foods labeled "good," tend to be over-eaten, leading to intolerances and sensitivities. It is true, food can be medicine or poison, but learning what is the right dose for your body is part of creating a healthy relationship with your food.

Naturopathic doctors are the most trained medical professionals in individualized nutritional advice. All health begins with the digestive system. To achieve optimal health, it is necessary to address nutrition. Ideally, the easiest and most sustainable program will maximize the nutrition you get from food. The goal is to increase the variety of foods you eat while also taking into account your limits and lifestyle. Diets that you may see in the media tend to be aggressive and not sustainable, which can result in low compliance and ultimately make you feel guilty for not following through with them. Naturopathic doctors have the time to spend with you to teach you the skills to eat foods that make you feel good and at your own pace.

If you recognize that you tend to emotional eat, it is important to seek support and the proper tools to address the underlying reasons for the emotions. If you experience guilt, anxiety, depression or shame leading you to over consume or under consume food, speak to your naturopath to create a plan to work through it together. Remember, you are not alone.

Why Work With a Naturopathic Doctor on Food?


The basics are important in order to build a good foundation. However, everyone's challenges are different. Naturopathic Doctors can provide you with individualized care and can meet your nutritional requirements at any stage in your life. Part of maximizing your nutrition is identifying food intolerances through specific testing or food challenges and learning when they are appropriate to avoid and to consume. Further, naturopaths have the knowledge and training to integrate your health concerns and nutrition. Age, hormones and other conditions will be always be taken into account when prescribing nutritional advice. It is imperative to address health holistically and comprehensively. 

Dr. Ann-Marie Regina, ND focuses on individualized nutritional counselling and helping patients make healthy lifestyle choices that are specific to them. Dr. Ann-Marie is now offering 30 minute nutritional consults focused solely on creating sustainable and effective dietary adjustments that address your concerns. During the nutritional counselling visits, Dr. Ann-Marie will assess your nutrition with an assessment tool which investigates your water, protein, fat, starch, vegetable, fruit and fibre intake. The assessment will also take your health concerns, activity level, hormones, food intolerances, age and sex into consideration.

To learn more about nutritional counselling and which foods work best with your body, please call the clinic at 905-940-2727 to book an appointment with Dr. Ann-Marie Regina or to schedule a complimentary 15 minute "meet and greet."



Thursday, October 31, 2019

Five Signs That You May Have an Overgrowth of Candida

By: Dr. Jessica Nesbitt ND, CFMP

Candida / Yeast is a type of fungus that is normally found in the digestive tract, urinary tract, vagina, mouth and skin.  Problems arise when Candida starts to overgrow in these areas and causes a wide variety of symptoms. Well known signs of a yeast overgrowth can occur when women have a yeast infection, and when babies have oral thrush or a diaper rash. In my ten years of clinical practice I have seen and treated many patients that did not realize that they were dealing with an overgrowth of yeast, and suffering unnecessarily as a result. In this article I will review five less common signs that your body may be struggling to deal with an overgrowth of yeast.

1. Joint Pain

Candida arthritis has been studied (PMID:26858961) and found to occur in patients ranging from children to senior citizens. The most common joints affected were the hips and knees. Early symptoms noted were swelling, redness and pain in the joints. A common factor found in many of the patients studied was a pre-existing overgrowth of Candida that spread through the bloodstream to the joints.

2. Chronic Infections / Weak Immune System

When I have patient report that they suffer from reoccurring infections such as sinusitis I am suspecting that candida/fungus may be to blame and not bacteria (PMID:19008573).  When patients are treated with antibiotics for an infection, most times it does a good job of killing the bad bacteria, and the patient feels better. But, in some patients the antibiotics set up a situation where Candida can overgrow and weaken their immune system. When this happens I often see patients who have reoccurring ear infections, sinus infections, respiratory infections and yeast infections - sometimes on a monthly basis.  It can be a difficult cycle to break, but I have successfully helped patients of all ages to break the cycle of chronic infections, strengthen their immune system and treat their yeast overgrowth.

3. Digestive Upset

Candida can potentially cause a number of different symptoms of indigestion, starting with intense sugar cravings. Candida's main food source is sugar, and when my patients notice they are craving sugar daily, it is a red flag for me that they may have an overgrowth of Candida in their intestines. Other common digestive complaints associated with Candida are: bloating, gas and irritable bowel disease (PMID:31648369).

4. Brain Fog

This is described by some of my patients as having a cloud or fogginess when trying to think or read. It can manifest in daily life as experiencing problems with memory and lack of focus.  These symptoms  occur when Candida is metabolized. It is broken down into chemical by-products that are normally filtered through the liver. But when Candida has overgrown, the liver is unable to keep up with filtering large amounts of chemical by-products, and as a result symptoms affecting brain function can occur.

5. Skin Rashes

For many skin conditions such as eczema, psoriasis, toe nail fungus and jock itch,  Candida is a common root cause that needs to be addressed. Common areas that are affected by Candida are: under the breasts, armpits, groin and skin folds on the belly or thighs. The skin will appear red and may have small pimple-like bumps and be itchy.


An overgrowth of Candida can be a potential root cause for many health complaints that you may be experiencing. In my practice I screen all new patients for an overgrowth of Candida on their first visit, and find up to 80% of people do have some amount of a yeast overgrowth. 

If you suspect that you may have an overgrowth of Candida, I am pleased to offer a 45 minute Yeast/Candida focused appointment where you will be assessed for yeast and provided treatment. The cost of this visit is $135.

If you would like to learn more,  I also offer a complimentary 15 minute "meet and greet". Please note, no assessment or treatment is given during this visit. If you have any questions,  I can be reached at jnesbitt@naturopathicfoundations.ca






Are the changing seasons causing your anxiety?

By Dr. Ann-Marie Regina, ND 

How does change effect anxiety?


With the days becoming shorter, the human body and mind is beginning to prepare for the transition.  Change is occurring constantly in our lives. Whether it be a new season, new job or relationship, a change in lifestage (ie. puberty or menopause) there is always a period of adjustment and transition which can be challenging for some. How do you cope with change? Does it make you feel overwhelmed or off kilter? Does change make you fearful?

Change for some can result in anxiety. Fear of the unknown can be disruptive to our comfortable lives. Anxiety for a short period of time is normal. It acts as motivation to accomplish our goals or tasks. The issue is when anxiety becomes chronic. Chronic anxiety can worsen pre-existing conditions or even contribute to new ones. Conditions such as insomnia, irritable bowel syndrome, depression and many more can be triggered by anxiety. As anxiety persists, quality of life decreases and has a negative impact on overall health.

Symptoms of Anxiety


Common symptoms of anxiety include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Running or racing thoughts
  • Abdominal pain & bloating
  • Muscle tension
  • Insomnia
  • Fatigue
  • Heart palpitations 
  • Restlessness & excessive worrying
  • Panic attacks 
  • Depression 
It is important to consider that there may be other health conditions causing the above symptoms. Consult with your naturopathic doctor or health care provider to rule out conditions other than anxiety.

What can you do to decrease anxiety in the fall & winter months?


1. Get your sleep Research consistently shows how important sleep is for mood. Having a good night's sleep allows your mind and body to rest and heal. Sleep is also a necessary factor in modulating hormones which can contribute to anxiety if your hormones are imbalanced. If your anxiety is keeping you up at night, you can add some relaxing hobbies to your bedtime routine such as meditation, a warm bath, light yoga or stretches, reading a book, or practise journaling.

2. Be Active As we know, getting a daily dose of exercise can help reduce anxiety. But how? You've probably heard of the "fight or flight" response, which is activated when anxiety or fear is present. The body and mind are trained to want to run or fight, which now can be translated into exercise. So when feelings of anxiety are overwhelming, give in to your body's desire. About 20-30 minutes a day of exercise, whether it be a walk outside or lifting weights, will have a significant impact on your mental health.

3. Meditate The research on meditation is profound in terms of its effects on reducing anxiety and other mental health disorders. Meditation creates an attitude of non-judgement and self love, which are attributes that can seem scarce while experiencing anxiety. The key to meditation is the ability to live in the present moment, which is a major way to combat anxiety. Anyone that feels anxiety knows that their feelings are either tethered to some future event or something that has happened in the past. Living consciously keeps the worries or fears about the past or future at bay, and it only takes 10 minutes each day.

4. Address lifestyle factors Anxiety is a complex emotion with multiple factors contributing to its presence. Lifestyle factors such as dietary changes are typically one aspect that is addressed when treating anxiety. Eliminate stimulants such as caffeine, alcohol and sugar that aggravate anxiety. Other stimulants such as technology are taxing on the nervous system. Remember to take time out of your day to be in nature and experience the restorative effects it has on the mind and body.
 
5. Vitamin D Vitamin D is a fat soluble vitamin that is activated by the sun and made in your skin, liver and kidneys. Unfortunately, the amount of sunlight we get in the winter is very limited. It also doesn't help that most jobs keep us indoors all day, so even in the summer our sunlight exposure is reduced. Vitamin D has an essential role in mental health. It plays a role in modulating hormones, the immune system, bone formation and energy. Vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency is common in Canada, which is why it is so important to supplement. Before supplementing however, make sure you talk to your naturopathic doctor or other health care provider to find out what dose is right for you as toxicity is possible.

6. Know your triggers Your body goes through transitions of its own to accommodate the change of seasons. Recognizing what your triggers are will help to address the root cause of your anxiety. Are you being exposed to new allergens? Is this time of year difficult with school or work? Is your body having trouble adjusting to the change in weather? Did you want to accomplish more over the summer months? Transition can be a time for self reflection. Investigate your anxiety on a deeper level, recognize patterns, and then you will learn to address it.

When to talk to your naturopathic doctor about anxiety?


There are many contributing factors that can aggravate or trigger anxiety. If you are finding that your anxiety is becoming too overwhelming, make sure to always seek help. Naturopathic doctors have the unique ability to treat patients on an individual level. Our treatments are specific to what you need on your healthcare journey. 


Dr. Ann-Marie Regina is a Naturopathic Doctor at Naturopathic Foundations Health Clinic with a focus on helping patients make healthy lifestyle choices that are specific to them. If you want to learn more about what your body and mind need, Dr. Ann-Marie Regina, ND can help you. Please call the clinic at 905-940-2727 to book an appointment or to schedule a complimentary 15 minute "meet and greet."